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Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
University of Peradeniya
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Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
University of Peradeniya

Detailed Core Modules and Technical Electives


Core Modules
Sem 3 Sem 5 Sem 7
EE201 EE251 EE252 EE253 EE320 EE351 EE322 EE325 EE352 EE326 EE401/EE512 EE402/EE501 EE403/EE559 EE404/EE572 EE405

Sem 4 Sem 6 Sem 8
EE254 EE257 EE255 EE256 CO253 ME210 EE354 EE355 EE356 EE357 EE353 EE406
Technical Electives
EE511 EE514 EE518 EE522 EE539 EE593 EE554 EE575 EE587 CO561 ME592 EE538 EE576 EE593 EE580 EE540

Core Modules

EE 201: Network Analysis (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Calculate voltages and currents in general second order circuits under steady state and transient conditions.
  2. Calculate power dissipation in passive ac electrical networks
  3. Obtain Thevenin and Nortan equivalent circuits of passive ac electrical networks and derive maximum power transfer conditions.
  4. Calculate voltages and currents in passive electrical circuits using Laplace transform method.
  5. Calculate model parameters of two-port networks.

Syllabi:

Review of DC Circuits, First-order Circuits, Second-order Circuits, Sinusoidal Steady State Analysis, Laplace Transform and network analysis, Two-Port Networks
(L & T = 43 hrs, P & A = 4 hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 20%, Mid-Semester = 30%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. M.E. Van Valkenburg,“Network Analysis”, 3rd Edition, Prentice Hall, 1974
  2. Leon O. Chua, Charles A. Desoer, ErnestS. Kuh, “Linear and Non-Linear circuits”, Mcgraw Hill, 1987


EE 251: Principles of Electrical Measurements (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Calculate peak, dc and rms values, period, frequency and phase of alternating signals
  2. demonstrate how to use an oscilloscope for measurement of various signals.
  3. Obtain expressions for impedance ratio between arms of ac bridges.
  4. Design a sensor based system where the students will be exposed to practical consideration in sensor systems

Syllabi:

Fundamentals of Electrical Measurements, Review of ac. signal parameters, Measurement of ac signals, Comparison methods, Shielding and Earthing, Noise elimination techniques, Resonance methods, Sensors and transducers, Electrical Measurement Laboratory, Mini project
(L & T = 30hrs, P & A = 30hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 25%, Laboratory work = 10% Mid-Semester = 15%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. James W. Dally, William F. Riley, Kenneth G. McConnell, Instrumentation for Engineering Measurements, 1993
  2. J.G. Webster, The Measurement, Instrumentation and Sensors Handbook, 1998


EE252: Electronic Devices and Circuits (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Draw the output waveforms of rectifier, clipping and clamping circuits
  2. Calculate the dc bias point and draw dc and ac load lines for BJT, JFET, and MOSFET amplifier circuits
  3. Calculate voltage gain, current gain, input resistance, and output resistance of a BJT amplifier circuit using h-parameter small signal model
  4. Design a two stage direct coupled amplifier to satisfy a given set of specifications

Syllabi:

Basic Semiconductor Physics, Diodes, Bipolar Junction Transistor, Junction Field Effect Transistors, MOS Field Effect Transistors, Amplifiers, Feedback Amplifiers, Switching Circuits
(L & T = 35hrs, P & A = 20hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 15%, Laboratory work = 20% Mid-Semester = 15%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. J. Millman, C.C. Halkias, “Integrated Electronics: Analog and Digital Circuit Systems”, Tata McGraw-Hill Company Limited, 1991.
  2. P. Horowitz, W. Hill, “The Art of Electronics”, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, 1989.
  3. D. A.Neamen, “Microelectronics Circuit Analysis and Design”, 4th ed., McGraw-Hill, 2009.
  4. D. A Neamen, “Semiconductor Physics and Devices”, 1st ed., CRC Press, 1992.
  5. T. C. Hayes, W. Hill, “Student manual for The art of Electronics”, 1st ed., Cambridge University Press, 1996.


EE 253: Digital Logic Systems Design (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Define the basic building blocks of logic circuits
  2. Perform functional analysis of logic circuits
  3. Design logic circuits for given applications
  4. Optimize logic circuits
  5. Implement logic circuits using basic building blocks and programmable logic devices

Syllabi:

Representation of information, Boolean algebra, Boolean function simplification, Combinational logic design, Special logic circuits, Combinational logic design with Medium Scale Integrated (MSI) circuits, Electrical considerations of logic gates, Latches and Flip-flops, Design of sequential logic circuits, Register Transfer Level (RTL) design of circuits, Programmable logic devices, Fault diagnosis and testing
(L & T = 33hrs, P & A = 24hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 20%, Laboratory work = 10% Mid-Semester = 30%, End-Semester = 40%

References:

  1. D.Lewin,“Design of Logic Systems”,2nd ed., Springer, 1992.
  2. M. M. Mano, M. D. Ciletti, “Digital Design”, 4th ed., Prentice Hall,2006.


EE254: Electronic Instrumentation (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Define the basic building blocks of electronic circuits
  2. Explain the fundamental concepts in signal conversion
  3. Use advanced instruments for measuring signals
  4. Give solutions to real world instrumentation problems
  5. Demonstrate the knowledge in practical aspects of designing instrumentation systems

Syllabi:

Operational Amplifiers, Op-Amp Applications, Basic signal conversion, Analogue to Digital Conversion techniques, Sample and Hold circuit, Digital to Analogue Conversion, Computer interfacing and Data acquisition (DAQ) systems, Software and Hardware tools for instrumentation, Advanced instruments, Digital Oscilloscope, Instrumentation Laboratory, Mini project
(L & T = 30hrs, P & A = 30hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 30%, Laboratory work = 20% End-Semester = 40%

References:

  1. H.S. Kalsi, “Electronic Instrumentation”,Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited, 2004.
  2. W. J. Tompkins, J. G. Webster, Interfacing Sensors to the IBM-PC, Prentice Hall, 1988.


EE257: Signals and Systems (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Apply Fourier analysis to obtain frequency domain information about time domain signals.
  2. Interpret the interrelationship between frequency and time domain properties.
  3. Demonstrate and explain spectral characteristics of signals using the spectrum analyser.
  4. Analyse the stability of LTI systems.
  5. Compute and Interpret frequency and time responses of LTI systems.

Syllabi:

Fundamental Concepts of Signals & Systems, Fourier Series, Fourier Transform, System Function of LTI systems, Stability of LTI systems, Frequency Response of LTI systems
(L & T = 41hrs, P & A = 8hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 20%, Laboratory work = 10% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. A. V.Oppenhiem, A. S.Willsky, “Signals and Systems”, 2nd ed., Prentice Hall, 1996.


EE255: Electric Power (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Describe different magnetic circuits, their properties and appreciate losses associated with them
  2. Calculate and measure currents, voltages, voltage regulation and efficiency of transformers
  3. Describe construction features and operating principles of auto-transformer, three-phase transformers, and instrument transformers
  4. Design an electrical installations and appreciate the safety measures used in installations

Syllabi:

Electromagnetic Energy conversion, Transformers, Electrical Installations and loads, Lighting, Lighting, Definitions, lamps, fixtures
(L & T = 21hrs, P & A = 18hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 20%, Laboratory work = 10% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. S.J. Chapman, “Electric Machinery Fundamentals”, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 2011.
  2. I. McKenzie-Smith, E. Hughes, “Electrical technology”, Longman Ltd., 1995.
  3. D. Locke, “Guide to the Wiring Regulations”, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2012.
  4. RüdigerGanslandt, H. Hofmann “Handbook of Lighting Design”, DruckhausMaack, Lüdenscheid, 1992.


EE256: Power and Energy (2 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Calculate the voltages, currents and power of delta and star connectedthree phase systems
  2. Discuss and demonstrate different methods of power mreasurements
  3. Describe the options and requirements of power generation, transmission and distribution systems in Sri Lanka
  4. Describe different renewable sources used for electric power generation and calculate the power generated by some of these sources
  5. Calculate the power factor correction capacitors required for different applications

Syllabi:

Three phase Systems, Measurement of Power/Energy, Introduction to Power Systems, Tariff and Demand Side Management, Renewable energy.
(L & T = 24hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 20%, Laboratory work = 10% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. B.M. Weedy, B.J. Cory, N. Jenkins, J.B. Ekanayake, G. Strbac, “Electric Power Systems”, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2013.
  2. H. Saadat, “Power system Analysis”, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 2002.


CO253: Introduction to Programming and networking for Electrical Engineering (3Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Convert a simple well defined algorithm into a computer program by using a low-level programming language
  2. Use the memory management primitives of a low-level programming language Reason about a piece of code
  3. Explain how the layers and the associated protocols work together
  4. Explain the functionality of commonly used network protocols

Syllabi:

Programming Concepts, Introduction to Programming, Introduction to Programming, Language Basics, Computer Networking.
(L & T = 33hrs, P & A = 24hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 20%, Laboratory work = 20% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 40%

References:

  1. A. V. Aho, J.D. Ulman, “Foundations of Computer Science: C edition”, Computer Science Press, 1992.
  2. J. F. Kurose, K. W. Ross, “Computer Networking, A Top Down Approach”, 6th ed., Pearson Education, 2010.


ME210: Thermodynamics for Electrical and Electronic Engineers (2 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Estimate the efficiency, work, and heat interaction of a steam power plant using appropriate approximations.
  2. Quantify the performance of refrigeration and heat pump systems.
  3. Calculate the heating and cooling load of a typical domestic and industrial heating and ventilation systems.
  4. Estimate the heat transfer occurring in a simple thermodynamic system

Syllabi:

Applications of First and Second laws of Thermodynamics, Topics in Heat Transfer, Thermodynamic properties, Industrial psychrometry and air conditioning
(L & T = 27hrs, P & A = 6hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 20%, Mid-Semester = 30%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. Kenneth C. Weston, “Energy Conversion – The e-book”, Available online at http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~kenneth-weston/, 1992
  2. John H. Lienhard IV and John H. Lienhard V, “A Heat Transfer Textbook”, 4th edition,Dover Publications, 2012, Available online at http://web.mit.edu/lienhard/www/ahtt.html


EE320: Electromagnetic Theory (2 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Solve electromagnetic problems
  2. Use Maxwell’s equations to time varying fields
  3. Describe propagation and reflection of plane waves using Maxwell’s equations

Syllabi:

Review of vector calculus, Electrostatics, Magnetostatics, Time varying fields, Plane waves
(L & T = 30hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 20%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 60%

References:

  1. J. D. Kraus, D.Fleisch, “Electromagnetics”, McGraw-Hill, 5th Edition, 1999
  2. S. R. Hoole, P. R. Hoole, “A modern short course in engineering electromagnetics”, Oxford University Press, 1996.
  3. E. C. Jordan, K. G. Balman “Electromagnetic waves and radiating systems”, Prentice-Hall, 2nd Edition, 1997.


EE351: Electronic Circuits. (3 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Design, construct and measure performance of RC oscillators and active filters.
  2. Calculate output power, power dissipation, and efficiency of wideband amplifiers.
  3. Analyze and design high frequency transistor circuits using hybrid-π model.
  4. Explain the functioning of digital logic circuit.
  5. Understand the basic operational characteristic of power semiconductor devices.
  6. Analysis the switch mode power topologies and their characteristics in steady state.
  7. Suggests power electronics solutions for application requirements.

Syllabi:

Large signal amplifiers, High-frequency response of Amplifiers, Oscillator Circuits, Active Filters, Power Semiconductor Devices, Digital Logic Circuits, Application of Power Devices and Power Conversion Circuits, Electronic Circuits Laboratory.
(L & T = 39hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 30%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. J. Millman, C.C. Halkias, “Integrated Electronics: Analog and Digital Circuit Systems”, McGraw-Hill, 1991
  2. P. Horowitz, W. Hill, “The Art of Electronics”, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, 1989.
  3. D. A. Neamen, “Microelectronics Circuit Analysis and Design”, 4th ed., McGraw-Hill, 2009.


EE322: Embedded Systems Design (3 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Define the embedded systems and explain the applications
  2. Explain the functional principles of an embedded system
  3. Explain the real time operation of an embedded system
  4. Design and Develop an embedded system
  5. Evaluate and Optimize the performance of an embedded system

Syllabi:

Introduction to Embedded Systems, Microprocessor/Microcontroller Architecture, Embedded processors, Memory Architectures, Multitasking, Task scheduling, Embedded systems analysis and verification, Embedded system modeling techniques, Embedded systems laboratories, Embedded systems mini project.
(L & T = 27hrs, P & A = 36hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 40%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 40%

References:

  1. M. Wolf,“Computers as Components”, The Morgan Kaufmann Series in Computer Architecture and Design, 2012.
  2. S.Siewert,“Real Time Embedded Systems”, Charles River Media, 2007


EE325: Digital Signal Processing (3Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Apply discrete time techniques to obtain frequency domain information about time domain discrete signals.
  2. Interpret the interrelationship between frequency and time domain properties in discrete time.
  3. Analyse the stability of discrete time LTI systems.
  4. Compute and Interpret frequency and time responses of LTI systems.
  5. Design digital filters for given specifications.

Syllabi:

Introduction to Discrete and Digital Signals and Systems, Time Domain Analysis, z-Transform, Discrete Time Systems, Stability of Discrete Time Systems, Spectral Estimation.
(L & T = 40hrs, P & A = 10hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 10%, Laboratory work = 10%, Mid-Semester = 30%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. J. G. Proakis, D. G. Manolakis, “Digital Signal Processing: Principles, Algorithms, and Applications”, MacMillan Publishing, 1992.
  2. A. V. Oppenhein, R. W. Schafer,“Digital Signal Processing”, Prentice-Hall, 1975.


EE352: Automatic Control (2 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Define, identify signal flows of control systems and analyze the impact of feedback on the performance.
  2. Differentiate Single-Input-Single-Output (SISO) Linear Time Invariant (LTI) control systems and model them using linear differential equations and analyze stability.
  3. Analyze control systems using time domain responses for standard test signals and frequency domain tools, namely Bode diagrams, Nayquist diagrams and Root Locus diagrams.
  4. Design controllers to meet time and frequency domain specifications using P, PI, PD, PID, Pole placement, Pole-Zero cancellation, Phase Lead, Phase Lag and Phase Lag-Lead compensation methods and interpret their merits and demerits.
  5. Analyse the impact of controllers on the performance, implement the controller designs using analogue electronics and solve practical issues using standard techniques.

Syllabi:

Basics, System modelling, Modelling of Practical systems, Time domain analysis, Frequency domain analysis, Controller design in continuous domain
(L & T = 26hrs, P & A = 8hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 5%, Laboratory work = 15% Mid-Semester = 30%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. FaridGolnaraghi and Benjamin C. Kuo, “Automatic Control Systems”, 9th Ed., Wiley, 2009.
  2. Richard C. Dorf, Robert H. Bishop, “Modern Control Systems”, 12th Ed., Prentice Hall, 2010.
  3. Katsuhiko Ogata, “Modern Control Engineering”, 5th Ed., Prentice Hall, 2009.


EE326: Electrical Machines (3 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Describe the construction and principle of operation of different electrical machines.
  2. Understand equivalent circuits of dc, synchronous and induction machines and calculate different parameters.
  3. Explain the basic speed control methods for dc, synchronous, and induction machines.
  4. Describe the principle of operation of induction generators.
  5. Understand the principle of operation of stepper and brushless dc machines.
  6. Select and size electrical machines for different applications.

Syllabi:

Overview, DC Machines(Brushed, AC Machine Basics, Synchronous Machine, Three-phase Induction machines, Single phase induction motors, Induction generators
(L & T = 39hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 15%, Laboratory work = 15%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. S.J. Chapman, “Electric Machinery Fundamentals”, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 2011.
  2. A. E. Fitzgerald, C. Kings, “Electric Machinery”, McGraw-Hill, 1990.
  3. I. McKenzie-Smith, E. Hughes, “Electrical technology”, Longman Ltd, 1995.


EE357: Communication Systems (3 credits )

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Evaluate and compare different analog, base band, band pass, single and multiple carrier modulation methods and to design AM/FM communication systems.
  2. Describe principles of sampling, quantization and digitization and to design PCM systems.
  3. Quantify and compare bandwidth occupancy, data rate and signal power of modulated signals.
  4. Describe signal distortion, conditions for distortion less transmission and causes and effects of ISI, and to develop solutions for ISI.
  5. Describe FDM and TDM systems and the corresponding standards.

Syllabi:

Review of Signals and Systems, Signal Transmission, Linear Modulation, Exponential Modulationm, Pulse Code Modulation (PCM), Base Band Modulation, Introduction to Digital Carrier Wave Modulation, Introduction to Multi-Carrier Modulation and MIMO Systems
(L & T = 39hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 15%, Laboratory work = 15% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. B.Sklar, “Digital Communications: Fundamentals and Applications”, 2nd ed., Prentice-Hall, 2001.
  2. L. W. Couch, “Digital and Analogue Communication Systems”, Prentice-Hall,1997.
  3. S.Haykin, “Communication Systems”, 4th Edition, Wiley, 2001.
  4. A.Molisch, “Wireless Communications”, 2nd Edition, Wiley, 2012.


EE353: Discrete Time Control Systems ( 3 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Define Computer Controlled Systems (CCS) using difference equations and analyse performance and stability.
  2. Approximate continuous time systems using Forward Euler, Backward Euler and Tustin’s method and calculate required sampling period.
  3. Design digital controllers to meet time and frequency domain specifications using P, PI, PD and PID, state feedback, pole placement and pole-zero cancellation methods and implement.
  4. Examine controllability, reachability, observability and detectability and design and implement State Observers
  5. Evaluate the impact of noise and design and implement Kalman filters for noisy systems

Syllabi:

Introduction to Discrete Time Control Systems, Stability of Discrete Time Control Systems, Continuous time approximations of controllers, Discretization of analog controllers, Discretization of Control Systems.
(L & T = 38hrs, P & A = 14hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 15%, Laboratory work = 15% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. Karl J. Åström, BjörnWittenmark, “Computer Controlled Systems”, 3rd Ed., Dover, 2011.
  2. Benjamin C. Kuo, “Digital Control Systems”, 2nd Ed., Oxford University Press, 1995.
  3. Richard C. Dorf, Robert H. Bishop, “Modern Control Systems”, 12th Ed., Prentice Hall, 2010.


EE354: Power Engineering (3 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Discuss the operating principles, different components and control of synchronous generators
  2. Employ different load flow techniques to simple power systems
  3. Use commercially available software to carry out load flow studies in Sri Lankan power system
  4. Calculate fault currents associated with balanced and unbalanced faults
  5. Use equal area criteria to determine stability of a system and derive swing equation

Syllabi:

Review of Synchronous Machine, Operational Features of Synchronous Machines Synchronous Generators, Synchronous generators in power system, Induction generators in power system, Load flow studies, Fault analysis
(L & T = 32hrs, P & A = 26hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 15%, Laboratory work = 15% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. S.J. Chapman, “Electric Machinery Fundamentals”, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 2011.
  2. B.M. Weedy, B.J. Cory, N. Jenkins, J.B. Ekanayake, G. Strbac, “Electric Power Systems”, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2013.


EE355: Applied Electromagnetics (3 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Describe guided wave propagation in transmission lines and optical fibres
  2. Explain the operation of microwave components and sources
  3. Define basic antenna parameters
  4. Design a Yagi-Uda antenna to given specifications

Syllabi:

Transmission lines, Antennas, Wave guides, Microwave components and sources, Fiber optics.
(L & T = 40hrs, P & A = 10hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 15%, Laboratory work = 15% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. R. E. Collin, “Foundations for microwave engineering”, 2nd Edition, IEEE press, 2001.
  2. J. D. Kraus, D.Fleisch, “Electromagnetics”, McGraw-Hill, 5th Edition, 1999
  3. C. Balanis, “Antenna Theory, analysis and Design”, (2nd Edition), John Wiley and Sons, Inc, 1997.
  4. J.Gowar, "Optical communication systems", Prentice Hall, 1993


EE356: Electronic Product Design and Manufacture (3 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Define the basic steps in electronic product design and manufacture
  2. Perform worst case analysis of electronic circuits
  3. Identify and analyse noise and signal integrity issues in electronic circuits
  4. Design an electronic product (from concept to PCB to casing)
  5. Test electronic products

Syllabi:

Product Design and Development ,Product design process, Estimating power supply requirement (Power supply sizing), Power supply protection devices ,Noise consideration of a typical system, Noise in electronic circuit, Measurement of noise, Grounding, Shielding and Guarding, Signal integrity issues, PCB designing, Product testing, Enclosure sizing & supply requirements & materials for enclosure and tests carried out on enclosure, Thermal management and its types, Advanced topics in electronic product design and manufacture, Electronic product design mini project
(L & T = 30hrs, P & A = 30hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 50%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. A.E. Ward, J.A.S. Angus, “Electronic Product Design”, CRC Press, 1996.


EE401/EE512: Communication Theory (3 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Apply the concepts of probability theory to resolve communication and classification problems.
  2. Compute and interpret statistical parameters and functions related to random variables.
  3. Evaluate and conclude on properties and behaviour of random signals and processes.
  4. Examine the performance of analogue communication systems under noise.
  5. Examine the performance of digital communication systems under noise.

Syllabi:

Probability and Random Variables, Random processes, Gaussian Processes, Performance of Communication System in Noise.
(L & T = 42hrs, P & A = 6hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 20%, Mid-Semester = 30%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. A. Papoulis, S. U. Pillai, Probability, Random Variables and Stochastic Processes, Tata Mcgraw-Hill, 4th edition, 2002.
  2. S. S. Haykin, Communication Systems, 4th Edition, Wiley, 2001.
  3. A. B. Carlson, Communication Systems, 4th Edition, Mc-Graw Hill, 2002.


EE402/EE501: Advanced Control Systems (3 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Differentiate White box, Gray box and Black box modelling.
  2. Identify systems using non-parametric and parametric methods.
  3. Validate identified system models using standard techniques.
  4. Analyze nonlinearities and design controllers using describing functions.
  5. Implement multiple control loops for practical systems in Electrical and Electronic Engineering in Real-Time software environment.

Syllabi:

Introduction to System identification, Non-parametric methods ,Parametric methods, Analysis of common nonlinearities, Describing functions, Discrete Time Controller designs for practical systems in Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Real-time Implementation.
(L & T = 36hrs, P & A = 18hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 10%, Laboratory work = 10% Mid-Semester = 30%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. Lennart Ljung, “System Identification: Theory for the User”, 2nd Ed., Prentice Hall, 1999.
  2. Stanley M. Shinners, “Advanced Modern Control Systems Theory and Design”, 1st Ed., Wiley-Interscience, 1998.
  3. Phillipe A. Laplante, Seppo J. Ovaska, “Real-Time Systems Design and Analysis: Tools for the Practitioner”, 4th Ed., Wiley-IEEE Press, 2011.


EE403/EE559: Integrated Analog Electronic Circuits (3 Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Design a transistor differential amplifier to given specifications.
  2. Analyze the frequency response and the stability of a given integrated electronic circuit.
  3. Examine the performance of frequently used integrated circuit blocks.
  4. Examine the design process of integrated electronic circuits.
  5. Utilize electronic design automation tools to design and analyze integrated electronic circuits

Syllabi:

Analysis of transistor differential amplifier, Analog integrated sub-circuits and biasing, Analysis of frequency response, Application specific integrated circuits, Design considerations.
(L & T = 35hrs, P & A = 20hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 10%, Laboratory work = 20% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. J. Millman, C.C. Halkias, “Integrated Electronics: Analog and Digital Circuit Systems”, Tata McGraw-Hill Company Limited, 1972.
  2. P. Horowitz, W. Hill, “The Art of Electronics”, 2nd ed., Cambridge University Press, 1989.
  3. Donald A Neamen, “Electronic Circuit Analysis and Design”, 2nd ed., McGraw-Hill, 2001.


EE404/EE572: Electric Power Systems (3Credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Derive ABCD parameters for short, medium and long lines and discuss the factors that govern line loadability
  2. Construct Bewley Lattice diagrams for different over-voltage surges
  3. Discuss protection of different systems and design a protection coordination system using manual calculations and commercially available software
  4. Calculate economic dispatch solutions
  5. Model different power system components and discuss different control approaches used in power system

Syllabi:

Components of the power system, Transient and over-voltage phenomena, Power System Protection
(L & T = 39hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 15%, Laboratory work = 15%, Mid-Semester = 20%

References:

  1. B.M. Weedy, B.J. Cory, N. Jenkins, J.B. Ekanayake, G. Strbac, “Electric Power Systems”, John Wiley & Sons Ltd., 2013
  2. H. Saadat, “Power system Analysis”, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 2002.
  3. J.J. Grainger, W.D. Stevenson, “Power System Analysis”, McGraw-Hill, 1994.


EE405: Undergraduate Project I (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Apply scientific principles, methods and knowledge to a short research project
  2. Provide a realistic plan of execution to deliver the project within a time
  3. Write a technical report containing a literature review, an evaluation of the given problem and draw conclusions based on the findings
  4. Communicate effectively in a forum

Syllabi:

Self-studies, Scheduled working hours, Contact hours with the supervisor
(P & A = 90hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 40%, Laboratory work = 20% Mid-Semester = 10%, End-Semester = 30%



EE406: Undergraduate Project II (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Apply scientific principles, methods and knowledge to a short research project
  2. Design and/or construct a prototype and/or simulation case and/or case study
  3. Provide a realistic plan of execution to deliver the project within a time
  4. Write a technical report containing a literature review, an evaluation of the given problem and draw conclusions based on the findings
  5. Communicate effectively in a forum

Syllabi:

Self-studies, Scheduled working hours, Contact hours with the supervisor
(P & A = 90hrs)

Assesment:

Portfolio = 40%, Report = 20%, Mid-Semester = 10%, End-Semester = 30%



Technical Electives

EE511: Antennas and Propagation (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Calculate radiation patterns and other fundamental parameters of antennas and arrays
  2. Design and fabricate microstrip antennas
  3. Explain antenna matching techniques.
  4. Do noise calculations of single and multi-stage devices.
  5. Do link designs of VHF, UHF, and microwave links and radar and satellite communication applications.

Syllabi:

Antenna Basics, Antenna Arrays ,Microstrip antennas, Matching Techniques, Propagation of Radio Waves ,Noise characterization, Space Wave propagation (VHF, UHF, and microwave link analysis and design), Ionospheric and surface wave propagation
(L & T = 39hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Laboratory work = 30% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. C. Balanis, “Antenna Theory, analysis and Design”, 2nd ed., John Wiley and Sons, Inc, 1997.
  2. R. E. Collin, “Antennas and Radiowave Propagation”, McGraw-Hill, 1985.
  3. D. M. Pozar, “Microwave Engineering”, 3rd ed., John Wiley and Sons, Inc, 2005.


EE514: Data Communications (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Justify the adoption of layered network architecture for data communication systems
  2. Describe the functions of different layers of ISO/OSI reference model (ISO/OSI-RM)and compare other network architectures with ISO/OSI-RM
  3. Describe the operation of circuit switching and packet switching networks and list their merits and demerits
  4. Explain main techniques and algorithms used to implement protocols commonly found in the lower three layers of the ISO/OSI-RM

Syllabi:

Overview, Protocol Architecture, Data Transmission, Guided and Wireless Transmission Signal Encoding Techniques, Digital Data Communication Techniques Data Link Control Multiplexing, Circuit Switching and Packet Switching, Routing in Packet Switched Networks, Congestion Control in Switched Data Networks. (L & T = 36hrs, P & A = 18hrs)

Assesment:

Laboratory work = 20% Mid-Semester = 30%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. W. Stallings, “Data and Computer Communications”, 9th ed., Pearson, 2010.


EE518: Digital Communications (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Analyse baseband signaling schemes and associated transmission techniques
  2. Analyse spectral properties and error probabilities of passband modulation schemes
  3. Design and apply block codes and convolutional codes for practical communication systems
  4. Explain the principles of information theory and their application for source coding and channel coding
  5. Design and simulate baseband/passband digital communication links.

Syllabi:

Baseband Data Transmission, Digital Passband Modulation, Error control coding, Introduction to information theory
(L & T = 40hrs, P & A = 10hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 15%, Laboratory work = 15% Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. S. Haykin, “Communication Systems”, 4th ed., Wiley, 2006.
  2. B. Sklar, “Digital Communications-Fundamentals and Applications”, Prentice-Hall,2009.
  3. J.G. Proakis, “Digital Communications”, 4th ed., Mc-Graw Hill, 2008.


EE522: Telecommunication and wireless systems (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Analyse the performance of switching systems using tools such as queuing theory and Erlang formula.
  2. Design an intensity modulated/direct detection optical fibre communication link.
  3. Calculate the link budget of a communication link.
  4. Analyse the impact of channel conditions and receiver mobility on the received signal
  5. Breakdown and examine high level functions of practical systems including local area netorks and cellular mobile networks.

Syllabi:

Switching & Signalling, Teletraffic Engineering, Optical Fiber Communication systems Wireless channel characterization, Principles of mobile communications, Diversity and multi-antenna techniques Spread spectrum and multicarrier systems, Wireless communication standards
(L & T = 41hrs, P & A = 8hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 30%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. R. L. Freeman, “Telecommunication system engineering”, 2004, Wiley.
  2. R. Ramaswami, K. S. Sivarajan, G. H. Sasaki, “OpticalNetworks – A practical perspective”, 3rd ed., Morgan Kaufman Publishers, 2009.
  3. T. S. Rappaport, “Wireless Communications”, Prentice-Hall, 2nd ed.,2002.
  4. A. F. Molisch, “Wireless Communications”, Wiley, 2010.


EE539: Nonlinear and Multivariable Systems (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Analyze and describe the characteristics and phenomena of nonlinear and multivariable systems extending the knowledge of linear single input single output systems.
  2. Develop control strategies for multivariable systems.
  3. Evaluate stability of nonlinear systems and describe limit cycles.
  4. Develop control strategies for nonlinear systems based on feedback linearization.
  5. Determine appropriate control strategies and analyze the behaviour of control schemes such as fuzzy, adaptive, sliding mode or back-stepping control.

Syllabi:

Fundamental concepts and representing nonlinear systems, Stability, instability and limit cycles Controlling nonlinear systems, Fundamental concepts and representing multivariable systems, Performance analysis of multivariable systems, Introduction to Controlling MIMO systems
(L & T = 39hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 30%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. H. Khalil, “Nonlinear systems”, 3rd ed., Prentice Hall, 2001.
  2. Jean-Jacques Slotine, Weiping Li,“Applied Nonlinear Control”, Prentice Hall, 1991.
  3. S. Skogestad, I. Postlethwaite, “Multivariable Feedback Control: Analysis and Design”, Wiley, 2005.


EE593: Industrial Robotics and Automation (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Differentiate and describe various applications of industrial robot systems and industrial automation systems
  2. Design, model and analyze robot manipulators and automation systems and evaluate their performance in terms of their kinematics, kinetics, and control
  3. Analyze and justify the benefits of robotic and automation systems and design
  4. Program automation and robotic system hardware assigned for a specific task

Syllabi:

Industrial automation systems and applications of robotics, Rigid Motions and Homogeneous Transformations ,Forward Kinematics, Inverse Kinematics ,Velocity Kinematics ,Path and Trajectory Planning Fundamentals, Fundamentals of Industrial Automation ,Sensors, Actuators and Controllers, Communication systems in automation, Automation software and hardware, Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems, (SCADA) and Distributed Control Systems (DCS)
(L & T = 39hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments = 30%, Laboratory work = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. M. W. Spong, S. Hutchinson, M. Vidyasagar,“Robot Modeling and Control”, Wiley, 2006.
  2. Roland Siegwart, Illah R. Nourbakhsh, DavideScaramuzza,“Introduction to Autonomous Mobile Robots”, MIT Press, 2011.
  3. Terry Bartelt,“Industrial Automated Systems: Instrumentation and Motion Control”, Cengage Learning, 2010.
  4. K.L.S.Sharma,“Overview of Industrial Process Automation”, Elsevier, 2011.


EE554: Microwave Techniques (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Use scattering parameters to characterize performance of microwave circuits.
  2. Design and analyze strip-lines and micro-strip lines.
  3. Design microwave circuits to meet the given specifications and verify performance using CAD tools and network analyzer measurements.
  4. Plot gain and stability circles of active devices on the smith chart and analyze performance and stability.
  5. Design active circuits (amplifiers, oscillators, mixers and microwave switches).

Syllabi:

Over view of microwave systems, subsystems and components ,Transmission line theory (a review), Two-port parameters, Microstrip lines and striplines, Design of microstrip components, Microwave amplifiers, Microwave Oscillators ,Microwave mixers, Microwave switching devices ,Computer aided design (CAD) of microwave circuits. (DCS)
(L & T = 30hrs, P & A = 30hrs)

Assesment:

Laboratory work = 30%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. David M. Pozar, “Microwave Engineering”, 3nd ed., John Wiley and Sons, Inc, 2005.
  2. Guillermo Gozalez, “Microwave Transistor Amplifiers”,2nd ed., Prentice-Hall, 1997.


EE575: Power Electronic Applications and Design (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Identify potential topologies-and-control for selected power electronics applications.
  2. Illustrate harmonic related issues, standards and mitigation techniques.
  3. Model DC/DC converters for dynamic analysis and design basic controllers.
  4. Design protection and magnetics for switched mode power supplies.

Syllabi:

Introduction and Review of Fundamentals, Principle of operation of selected applications, Utility Interactions and Harmonic Mitigation, Modeling, Simulation, Controller Design, Design Considerations, Construction of a Laboratory Prototype and Performance Verification.
(L & T = 36hrs, P & A = 18hrs)

Assesment:

Assessment = 20%, Laboratory work = 10%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%

References:

  1. N. Mohan, T. Undeland, W. Robbins “Power Electronics: Converters, Applications and Design, Wiley, 2003.
  2. B. W. Williams, “Power Electronics: Devices, Drives, Applications and Passive Components”, Macmilan, 1992.
  3. B. K. Bose, “Modern Power Electronics and AC drives”, Prentice Hall, 2001.
  4. Robert W. Erickson, Dragan Maksimovic, “Fundamentals of Power Electronics”,2nd ed., Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2001.


EE587: Digital Systems Design and Synthesis (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Describe the design of complex digital systems using a (Verilog based) behavioural synthesis approach.
  2. Implement the algorithms which underpin behavioural synthesis including scheduling, allocation and binding.
  3. Apply behavioural synthesis to generate designs optimised for user-defined constraints.
  4. Describe digital design for testability techniques at the behavioural and RTL levels.
  5. Use emerging System on Chip (SoC) design and test methods.
  6. Describe system level low power design methods.

Syllabi:

Review of digital systems design ,Hardware description languages and behavioural synthesis of digital systems, Behavioural synthesis data structures and algorithms,Synthesis and design space,Scheduling algorithms - constructive ,Interconnect allocation and optimisation ,Allocation and binding algorithms Transformational/iterative approaches ,Related topics, Test synthesis for digital systems, Digital Synthesis Laboratory.
(L & T = 30hrs, P & A = 30hrs)

Assesment:

Assessment = 30%, Laboratory work = 10%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 40%

References:

  1. S.Palnitkar, “Verilog HDL”, Prentice Hall Professional, 2003.
  2. M. D. Ciletti ,“Advanced Digital Design with the Verilog HDL”, Prentice Hall Professional, 2011.
  3. Giovanni De Micheli, “Synthesis and optimisation of digital circuits”, McGraw-Hill Higher Education, 1994.
  4. SabihGerez, “Algorithms for VLSI design automation”, Wiley, 1998.
  5. John P Elliott, “Understanding behvioural synthesis”, Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1999.


EE561: Industrial Instrumentation (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Design Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems
  2. Develop instrumentation systems using Data Acquisition (DAQ) hardware and software
  3. Apply techniques in signal processing, estimation and intelligent systems to develop advanced instrumentation systems

Syllabi:

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems (SCADA), Principles of Data Acquisition (DAQ) systems ,State estimation techniques in instrumentation, Sensor fusion Sensor Networks ,Smart sensors Intelligent Instruments.
(L & T = 30hrs, P & A = 30hrs)

Assesment:

Laboratory work = 30%, Mid-Semester = 30%, End-Semester = 40%.

References:

  1. G. Clarke, “Practical Modern SCADA Protocols”, Elsevier, 2004.
  2. Dargie, W., Poellabauer, C., "Fundamentals of wireless sensor networks: theory and practice”, Wiley, 2010.
  3. R.R. Brooke, “Multi-Sensor Fusion”, Prentice Hall, 1997.
  4. R.O. Duda, “Pattern Classification”, Wiley, 2001.
  5. Y. Bar-Shalom, T. Kirubarajan, “Estimation with applications to tracking and navigation”, Wiley, 2001.
  6. “LABVIEW User Manual”, National Instruments, 1998.


EE592: Modern Power Systems (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Carry out an optimisation exercise to understand the operation of Sri Lankan power system with large penetration of renewables
  2. Calculate different quantities associated with HVDC transmission
  3. Describe different FACTS devices available for active power flow control
  4. Describe different devices available for reactive power flow control
  5. Analyse a given system with active and reactive power control method

Syllabi:

Coordinated operation of the power system, Power system optimisation ,HVDC transmission, Flexible ac transmission systems, Reactive power compensation, Power quality, Harmonics and filters, Smart Grid and Smart metering, Computer based project
(L & T = 36hrs, P & A = 18hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments= 25%, Laboratory work = 10%, Mid-Semester = 25%, End-Semester = 40%.

References:

  1. Hingorani, N.G. & Gyugyi, L., “Understanding Facts: Concepts and Technology of Flexible AC Transmission Systems”, IEEE, 1999.
  2. Arrilaga, J., Liu, Y.H. & Watson, N.R., “Flexible power transmission: The HVDC options”, Wiley, 2007
  3. Baker, C. et. Al., “HVDC: Connecting to the future”, Alstom Grid, 2010.


EE538: Electrical Machines and Drive Systems (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Explain the difference between the high performance and other basic drives.
  2. Model DC and selected AC machines for dynamic considerations.
  3. Design basic-controllers for DC and AC machines.
  4. Explain the operation of Stepper and Brushless Motors with different converter topologies, and to identify merits and demerits.

Syllabi:

Introduction to steady-state and dynamic performance of DC Motor drives, Introduction to AC drives, Introduction to vector control basics-through induction machines ,Stepper Motor Drives.
(L & T = 39hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments= 20%, Laboratory work = 10%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%.

References:

  1. B. K. Bose, “Modern Power Electronics and AC drives”, Prentice Hall, 2001.
  2. W. Leonhard , “Control of Electric Drives”, Springer, 2001.
  3. R. Krishnan, “Electric Motor Drives: modelling Analysis and Control”, Prentice Hall, 2001.


EE576: High Voltage Engineering (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Describe the basic concepts behind generation of ac, dc, impulse voltage and use them in selected tests
  2. Describe the basic concepts behind measurements of ac, dc, impulse voltage and use them in selected tests
  3. Describe the basic principels of gaseous, liquid and solid breakdown
  4. Describe the different non-destrcutive tests used in high voltage engineering and demonstrate their applications on high voltage apparatus
  5. Describe the basic concept behind insulation coordination and demonstrate knowledge on lightning and lightning protection

Syllabi:

Generation High Voltages, Measurements of High voltages, Breakdown Phenomena, High voltage Tests, Lightning phenomena, Insulation Co-ordination.
(L & T = 36hrs, P & A = 18hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments= 15%, Laboratory work = 15%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%.

References:

  1. E. Kuffel, W.S. Zaengl and J. Kuffel, "High voltage engineering Fundamentals", Elsevier, 2nd ed., 2008.


EE593: Advanced Signal Processing (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Calculate basic stochastic signal processing parameters and functions and examine its application to signal processing based engineering applications.
  2. Analyze and deduce the operations of the Wiener filter in relation to channel estimation/ equalization/interference cancellation applications, and evaluate the impact of sensor noise for these applications.
  3. Combine the relationship between the Eigen-structure of the ACM, PSD and performance surface.
  4. Breakdown the adaptation process of the SD and LMS algorithms to multiple modes and analyze the convergence and transient behaviours of these adaptive techniques and identify the impact of transform domain approaches to convergence behaviour.
  5. Design LMS based adaptive approaches to resolve problems relating to channel estimation/equalization/interference cancellation/beamforming.

Syllabi:

Introduction, Basics of Stochastic Signal Processing ,Weiner Filter, Eigen Analysis and Performance Surface, Iterative algorithms for Optimization, Adaptive signal processing techniques: LMS Algorithm, Transform Domain Approaches, Recent Advances in Signal Processing
(L & T = 39hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments= 30%, Mid-Semester = 20% End-Semester = 50%.

References:

  1. B. Farhang-Boroujeny, “Adaptive Filters Theory and Applications”, John Wiley and sons Ltd., 1998, reprint 2000.
  2. S. Haykin,“Adaptive Filter Theory”, Prentice-Hall, 4th ed., 2001.
  3. Alan V Oppenhiem, Alan S Willsky, “Signals and Systems”, 2nd ed., Prentice Hall, 1996.


EE580: Introduction to Biomedical Engineering (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Represent a neuronal cell using the Hodgkin and Huxley model and derive the voltage waveforms for a given set of conditions.
  2. Design an electronic signal conditioning circuit to interface biopotentials such as EEG and ECG into a computer via a data acquisition card.
  3. Refer relevant standards and design an electrical wiring system for a critical care area or an operating theater of a healthcare facility in compliance with the standards.
  4. Reconstruct CT images using Fourier slice theorem, filtered back projection, and algebraic reconstruction technique.
  5. Process functional MRI data and identify the brain areas activated during a specific task.

Syllabi:

Introduction ,Introduction to Engineering aspects of molecular and cellular principles, Physiology, and organ systems, Bio-electromagnetism, Modeling of cardiac system, measurements, ECG, Bio-instrumentation, Biomaterials ,Biomechanics, Electrical Safety and Regulation, Biomedical Imaging Systems, Mechanical and electric models for ventilation, respiration and blood pressure measurement
(L & T = 39hrs, P & A = 12hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments= 15%, Laboratory work = 15%, Mid-Semester = 20%, End-Semester = 50%.

References:

  1. Enderle, John D., Susan M. Blanchard, and Joseph D. Bronzino, eds. “Introduction to Biomedical Engineering”, Elsevier Academic Press, 2005.
  2. J. Webster, ed., “Medical Instrumentation: Application and Design”, 4th ed., John Wiley & Sons, 2009.
  3. Duane Knudson, “Fundamentals of Biomechanics”, 2nd ed., Springer 2007.
  4. Buddy D. Ratner, Allan S. Hoffman , Biomaterials Science: An Introduction to Materials in Medicine, Elsevier, 1996.
  5. W. Mark Saltzman, “Biomedical Engineering: Bridging Medicine and Technology”, Cambridge University Press, 2009.


EE540: Nanotechnology for Electrical and Electronic (3 credits)

Intended Learning Outcomes (ILOs):

At the completion of this module students should be able to

  1. Explain the nanoscale paradigm in terms of properties at the nanoscale dimensions.
  2. Apply fundamentals of chemistry, physics, and engineering in nanotechnology.
  3. Demonstrate working knowledge of nanotechnology principles and industry applications.

Syllabi:

Introduction, Technologies for the Nanoscale, Nanoscale Manufacturing, Nanoscale Materials and Structures, Characterization, Electronic Nanodevices, Magnetic Nanodevices, Photonic Nanodevices, Societal, Health and Environmental Impacts. MEMS and NEMS
(L & T = 40hrs, P & A = 10hrs)

Assesment:

Assignments= 15%, Laboratory work = 15%, Mid-Semester = 30%, End-Semester = 40%.

References:

  1. K E Drexler, “Engines of Creation”, Oxford Paperbacks, New York, 1996.
  2. K E Drexler, “Nanosystems: Molecular Machinery, Manufacturing and Computation”, Wiley, 1992.
  3. Michael Kohler, Wolfgang Fritzsche, “Nanotechnology: An Introduction to Nanostructuring Techniques”, Wiley, 2008.
  4. Edward L. Wolf, “Nanophysics and Nanotechnology: An Introduction to Modern Concepts in Nanoscience”, Wiley, 2006.
  5. W. T. Huck, Wilhelm T. S. Huck, “Nanoscale Assembly: Chemical Techniques,” Springer Science+Business Media, 2005.
  6. K. Kaneto, S. Mashiko, “Nanotechnology and Nano-Interface Controlled Electronic Devices”, Elsevier, 2003.
  7. Vladimir V. Mitin, Viatcheslav A. Kochelap, Michael A. Stroscio, “Introduction to nanoelectronics: science, nanotechnology, engineering, and applications”, Cambridge Univesity Press, 2008.



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